ABruceMcMartin
#1 Posted : 24 June 2010 11:18:00(UTC)
ABruceMcMartin

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Danny don't worry about this..unless any else wants it..it's not hard to figure out. Must have been either tired or lazy at the time of writing - great course by the way![br]
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Cheers![br]
[br]
b[br][br]
Jamie M
#2 Posted : 24 June 2010 13:14:00(UTC)
Jamie M

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Posts: 1,522

hi bruce[br]
[br]
sorry to butt in and this isn't directly related to your question but i was looking at starting course and was wondering your thoughts on it, is it beneficial for an intermediate standard for eg?[br]
[br]
thanks
ABruceMcMartin
#3 Posted : 24 June 2010 17:33:00(UTC)
ABruceMcMartin

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Depends what you mean by intermediate standard: [br]
[br]
There are some 'intermediate standard' players who are pretty accomplished and conceivably know everything in this course, theoretically speaking, from the point of view of pentatonic scale patterns and some of the more basic techniques taught; but I am also sure that the 'intermediate player' can benefit from many of the styles exampled in the course of some of the current great players and their techniques. The course becomes progressively more challenging in terms of style, technique and scale adaption as you move forward. [br]
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I was/am an acoustic player ..steel strings..finger style..and so my experience with a pick was negligible. I was probably more behind the curve than most in taking on any course for rock and role electric.

Although my left hand is pretty quick, it didn't mean anything when my right hand could not (at first) get a consistent pick strike on a target string even with Doppler radar.. Yet despite the handicap with the right hand, I found the course very well designed, and the scale patterns and riffs taught, along with technique, in an orderly and not overwhelming way.... but it is thorough, make no mistake.

Consequently at least for me, the transition was not difficult but no cake walk either. Yet I happen to like to practice and to learn new things and with ongoing practice of the course material, my pick use became second nature.
So whatever your level of intermediate is, I am sure there is something in the course for you that is beneficial..
In short, I wouldn’t have any worries if I were you!
[br]
Go for it!
Cheers!

B.
Jamie M
#4 Posted : 25 June 2010 08:26:00(UTC)
Jamie M

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Posts: 1,522

thanks for your reply bruce you have been a great help[br]
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i will check it out[br]
[br]
thanks again
ABruceMcMartin
#5 Posted : 26 June 2010 10:41:00(UTC)
ABruceMcMartin

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Jamie M,[br]
[br]
Bear in mind also that you may not find what you are looking for. That is the selection of styles, and riffs emulated may not be the type of players or rock you listen to (E.g. Page, Young, Wylde, Satriani, Van Halen in order of appearance) These may not be the styles you like to play, so there is that also.

Also the riffs in the course are designed to get you in sync with pentatonic scale patterns and imho are more technical than as any real 'catchy' melody lines - which is fine by me but don't be looking for the next Billboard #1 hook here. [br]
[br]
There are some techniques here too beyond the standard hammer ons, slides, and pull offs. Pinch harmonics as example and tapping. And for me there is a leaning in the course toward the players who are wizards of the fretboard and not necessarily great rock songsters - again just my opinion and not a criticism of the course.[br]

Personally I am not a great fan of shredders and wizards of technical power housing using all the screeching gumpf like pull off taps and pinch harmonics - too gimmicky for me as I am old school of the “if it can’t make you move, it ain’t got a groove and if it can’t make you roll it got no soul…” mentality. I like hooks that are addictive that you want to play again and again. This is what great songs and riffs are made of…and of course rhythm, and more rhythm. Rhythm IS rock and roll in my view but you are not going to get that here. You will want a separate course. This is about lead. And not a combination of lead and rhythm.

As a parting thought, I have to write that I think some of the modern players and modern 'rock and roll' aficionados have forgotten rhythm. Watch old Mellencamp's You Tube video Paper in Fire to know what I mean. These acoustic players have more soul and rhythm in their little fingers than some of today’s top shredders have in their whole body..
[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myo9wXrNUP4&feature=channel">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myo9wXrNUP4&feature=channel[/url]
Just my opinion…

Still in my view a great course for knowing what there is in rock and roll currently and what you need to know and practice..

Best

Bruce
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