MichaelLanigan
#1 Posted : 01 December 2008 13:50:00(UTC)
MichaelLanigan

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David Gilmour.....
Guest
#2 Posted : 02 December 2008 19:26:00(UTC)
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Gary Moore is a guitarist, who makes a riff out of a single note and it still sounds fantastic![br]
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=YzpMBscDNbM
Chromaticlord
#3 Posted : 02 December 2008 23:23:00(UTC)
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Yes I agree on Dave gilmour being the most melodic player,However you do get some great fast melodic players as well,but to answer your question less can be more some blues players have this ability to make every note someone like bb king or peter green[br][br]
to be honest i would rather listen to some solo by dave gilmour than dragonforce who have amazing technical skill but when a solo hits you and knocks you for six thats a lot better than hearing warp speed notes[br][br]
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WilliamGinieres
#4 Posted : 04 December 2008 11:18:00(UTC)
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Orangekeeper wrote:
David Gilmour.....
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'nuff said.
chrisfrazier
#5 Posted : 31 January 2010 17:01:00(UTC)
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I can't get anything out of ";light speed"; players. I too, take Gilmour, over any of the ";light speed"; players. Don't get me wrong, those players, are tremdously talented. I can't do what they do, and even if i wanted to, i couldn't. I can't feel anything with it. not like Gilmour. [br]
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I also think Alex Lifeson, is very good at doing more with less. [br]
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I know it's an old post, but i have an opinion on it.
Jack Daniels
#6 Posted : 13 April 2010 04:34:00(UTC)
Jack  Daniels

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I agree with everyone about David Gilmour, and the mention of Gary Moore who I love as well, BUT Gary used to step on the performances of his guest artist performers like Albert Collins, B.B. King, and Albert King. I believe that Gary was later chastised or "given fatherly advice" by both Albert and B.B. King for overplaying. B.B. said play every other note, and Albert said something to the same effect. To this day Gary really appreciates the advice of both the Kings and practices it in his performances (and it shows). Some of the greatest tunes have been those of artists that we'd call speedy players, but played at more "soulful" speeds, and yes Matt I agree that it's becoming a lost art.
Jack Hanly
#7 Posted : 18 October 2010 09:52:00(UTC)
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I think Peter Green is probably the king of 'less is more'. David Gilmour is very good as well. But I do agree that it is becoming lost. Modern rockers just seem to want to shred the hell out of their guitar, and the truth is, you'll probably hear a good solo alot better if they left gaps in their playing and picked out key phrases to play.[br]
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Sometimes the less is more approach can be even more difficult to play than shredding though, because every single note is exposed to the audience, whereas a shredder can hit a bum note but goes to the next one so quickly no-one notices. [br]
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I would like to see see some guitarists come out who adopt the 'old' way of playing.
Jamie M
#8 Posted : 01 November 2010 12:11:00(UTC)
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i cannot be doing with shredders. most of it sounds like frantic noise which you cant sit and chill out to. look at clapton, gilmour, bonamassa for less is more. they all have great feel and it doesnt take a thousand notes to get that across
Happyist
#9 Posted : 10 November 2010 07:36:00(UTC)
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Gilmoure, PGreen and GMoore - yes, I agree. I would add another player - Paul Kossoff and not to forget - Mr. Eric Clapton. He knows to play the right tone and note at the right time.
ikeherman
#10 Posted : 20 November 2011 17:54:00(UTC)
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I think everyone is forgetting the most important player at least in my time. Carlos Santana:))))) One note from him and its all over
Happyist
#11 Posted : 22 November 2011 10:49:00(UTC)
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and BB King - he is playing one single note and yeah, that's it :-)
TedJackson
#12 Posted : 24 November 2011 14:00:00(UTC)
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In the blue corner: Dave Gilmour.

In the red corner: Guthrie Govan [/b][/b]


Discuss! :~) [/b][/b][/b][/b]


Herb Cooke
#13 Posted : 26 November 2011 14:10:00(UTC)
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I'd rather see Gilmour and Guthrie jam then fight lol.

I've been getting back into Ritchie Kotzen lately, more the stints he's done with other bands then the solo stuff. Very bluesy and gets some amazing tube tones.


PorQueNo
#14 Posted : 07 December 2011 20:30:00(UTC)
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John Coltrane played a lot of notes. Miles Davis played very few. Both incredible musicians. Number of notes isn't the point, musicality is.
TedJackson
#15 Posted : 10 December 2011 20:05:00(UTC)
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PorQueNo wrote:
John Coltrane played a lot of notes. Miles Davis played very few. Both incredible musicians. Number of notes isn't the point, musicality is.


Exactly!

Adrian D'Souza
#16 Posted : 14 December 2011 14:45:00(UTC)
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Matt Z. wrote:
It Seems the main standard we judge guitar players by these days is how fast they can shred and by how many notes they fit into a given measure of music. While certain styles of music lend themselves to this type of playing I think the appreciation for less is more and the art of phrasing licks in a melodic musical fashion is being lost. Maybe it's just me. Anyone out there have any thoughts to share on the matter?
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Why do you think I've chosen to specialize in U2's form of music? I find shredders have this single minded focus that speed and many notes are everything. It's ok to shred but if that's all you do you limit yourself as a guitar player.[br]
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I play Edge's music, he is known to be a minimalist player creating some of the most fascinating guitar pieces and solos and general music for U2 that is making them go strong even to this day and making them probably one of the wealthiest bands in the world not to mention one of the longest running.[br]
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If all you do is shred 8 hrs a day your hands will be toast in 20 years. With edge's style I learn soloing (fast and slow), chords, ebow, slide guitar, distortion, overdrive, slow songs, fast songs, delays, shimmering and all of this in the past 1.5 years I will hit learning 8 u2 songs alone played hundreds of times over.[br]
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And I have no calluses on my hands. Some of my friends question how much I practice because they say real guitar players have very thick calluses, but let me tell you this style of playing I've adopted has saved my hands and I look forward to playing these songs right till I'm old and gray in my 80's.[br]
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Fast and many notes doesn't mean better music. Some of the best tunes are slow with few notes.[br]
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My 2 cents.
JacobReed
#17 Posted : 09 July 2012 18:56:00(UTC)
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I enjoy shred, but when it's too fast it's terrible. Look at Andy James on here. He is awesome and melodic and makes it fun to listen to.
John S
#18 Posted : 19 July 2012 17:34:00(UTC)
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Less notes played with more feel and the tone to go with it does it everytime and yes i also agree its an art sadly getting lost.
LickLibrary Levi
#19 Posted : 23 July 2012 13:07:00(UTC)
LickLibrary Levi

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It's just a trend I think. Just like when you first learn to ride a bike you want to see how fast you can go, or when you learn to drive you want to see how far you can go. I'm not taking away from the fast players though, because I love a bit of speed in the right place, but as with anything, it's a tool that should be utilised for effect.

To me, speed is like salt, or ketchup or whatever - you can't have a meal consisting of just salt, and you cant have a song that's just speed - but throwing some salt in for flavour isn't a bad thing.

Playing slowly, in time, with good tone, accurate bending, good dynamic etc is MUCH harder than playing fast - you want to play fast you just start slow and build up - it's easy to do therefore it's easy to get fast and then spend time hiding from those other aspects of your playing.

I really like guys who play fast, Johnson, Garsed, Gambale etc but I also love Robben Ford, Larry Carlton and BB. Larry wouldn't fit on a Megadeth record, just like Jason Becker has no place on a Shadows tune.

Horses for courses.
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